Frank Sinatra’s restored California home lists for $21.5 M

The best was yet to come for Frank Sinatra’s house.

The “New York, New York” singer’s mid-century modern rental northwest of Los Angeles has been restored and expanded, potentially buoying its worth by up to $10 million, the sellers are betting.

“I absolutely love the — to use a professional word — instant vibe,” listing broker Craig Knizek of The Agency told The Post.

Owners are asking $21.5 million for the Chatsworth, California home — after failing to sell it for a decade, asking between $12 million and $7.5 million.

Sinatra leased the 8,200-square-foot, seven-bed, seven-bath, two-half-bath ranch house in the late ’50s and early ’60s from the home’s original owner, Chase Manhattan Bank heiress Dora Hutchinson, according to Forbes.

Known interchangeably as the Fox House, Farralone and Byrdview House, the home with floor-to-ceiling windows was built in 1951 by Washington’s Kennedy Center architect William Pereira, according to the Los Angeles Historic Resources survey.

Owners are asking $21.5 million for the Chatsworth, Calif. home — after failing to sell it for a decade, asking between $12 million and $7.5 million.
Look familiar? This yard appears in Rihanna's "BBHMM" music video.
Look familiar? This yard appears in Rihanna’s “BBHMM” music video.
The house sits on top of a hill near the Santa Susana mountains.
The house sits on top of a hill near the Santa Susana mountains.

“When you walk up, you see through the floor-to-ceiling walls of glass through the house over the pool to see the pink-hued Santa Susana mountains — it’s spectacular,” Knizek told The Post.

Now, the bar, kitchen and bathrooms are restored to the original design based on the owners’ original plans, which the owner borrowed from the University of California Santa Barbara for the restoration.

The home has all its original woods and designs, while the roof, electric, plumbing, security, floors, windows and air conditioning were completely redone, according to the broker.

Known interchangeably as the Fox House, Farralone and Byrdview House, the home with floor-to-ceiling windows was built in 1951 by Washington’s Kennedy Center architect William Pereira.
Known interchangeably as the Fox House, Farralone and Byrdview House, the home with floor-to-ceiling windows was built in 1951 by Washington’s Kennedy Center architect William Pereira.
The home has all its original woods and designs, according to the broker.
The home has all its original woods and designs, according to the broker.
The roof, electric, plumbing, security, floors, windows and air conditioning were completely redone, according to the broker.
The roof, electric, plumbing, security, floors, windows and air conditioning were completely redone, according to the broker.

And on its 14 acres — nine more acres than included in previous listings — an L-shaped trellis couches a newly redone swimming pool. The pool house has been completely redone and now includes a massage room, bathroom, gym and new pool equipment for both pools.

The kitchen has been restored to its original design.
The kitchen has been restored to its original design.
The mid-century modern home has 16-foot ceilings with floor-to-ceiling windows.
The mid-century modern home has 16-foot ceilings with floor-to-ceiling windows.

A smaller dipping pool sits near the guest house, which allegedly once housed Marilyn Monroe. The guest house was not previously included in the listing and adds additional value to the house, said Knizek.

Since Sinatra, the home has also served as a set for AMC’s “Mad Men,” the 2006 film “Dreamgirls” and Rihanna’s 2015 music video “BBHMM.”

This mid-century modern house looks nearly identical to Sinatra’s “Twin Palms” estate, which he commissioned in 1947 and shared with his first wife Nancy Barbato and his second wife, Ava Gardner, whom he married in 1951.

The “When You’re Smiling” crooner owned homes in California, New Jersey and New York, and several of them have been on and off the market for years.

A smaller dipping pool sits near the guest house, which allegedly once housed Marilyn Monroe.
A smaller dipping pool sits near the guest house, which allegedly once housed Marilyn Monroe.
An L-shaped trellis couches a newly redone swimming pool.
An L-shaped trellis couches a newly redone swimming pool.

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