I believe startling 9/11 conspiracy theory

Spike Lee is living up to his outspoken reputation again. The controversial filmmaker is dropping bombshell statements about 9/11 conspiracy theories while on the promotion trail for his new HBO documentary, “New York Epicenters: 9/11-2021½.”

The “Do The Right Thing” director has now admitted that he doesn’t buy into “official explanations” of the terrorist bombings that devastated the world on September 11, 2001, while speaking with the New York Times on Monday.

In addition to the usual talking heads — Mayor Bill de Blasio, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Senator Chuck Schumer, frontline workers — the Oscar-winning filmmaker’s new four-part docu-series also features full-blown conspiracy theorists who profligate the notorious notion that jet fuel can’t melt metal beams.

Lee said he’s just fine with that: “I mean, I got questions — and I hope that maybe the legacy of this documentary is that Congress holds a hearing, a congressional hearing about 9/11.”

The incendiary remarks started when Times reporter Reggie Ugwu called Lee out for featuring several members of the conspiracy group Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth in his four-part docu-series, as its members have infamously suggested that government officials were somehow involved in the World Trade Center collapse.

“The amount of heat that it takes to make steel melt, that temperature’s not reached,” Lee said. “And then the juxtaposition of the way Building 7 fell to the ground — when you put it next to other building collapses that were demolitions, it’s like you’re looking at the same thing.”

He continued, “but people going to make up their own mind. My approach is put the information in the movie and let people decide for themselves. I respect the intelligence of the audience.”

Spike Lee is dropping bombshell statements about 9/11 conspiracy theories while on the promotion trail for his new HBO documentary, “New York Epicenters: 9/11-2021½.”
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Ugwu also confronted Lee about why he encourages the public to question the official findings on 9/11 — but chooses not to tout conspiracy theories about COVID-19 vaccines or voting fraud during the 2020 election.

Lee was characteristically blunt in his refusal to make excuses for any perceived hypocrisies in his public stances.

“People are going to think what they think, regardless. I’m not dancing around your question. People are going to think what they think,” he said. “People have called me a racist for “Do the Right Thing.” People said in “Mo’ Better Blues” I was anti-Semitic. “She’s Gotta Have It,” that was misogynist. People are going to just think what they think. And you know what? I’m still here, going on four decades of filmmaking.”

Lee has not responded to The Post’s request for comment about his new project.

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