R. Kelly’s sex trafficking conviction has drew the ire of Bill Cosby.

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According to his spokesperson, Andrew Wyatt, comedian Bill Cosby believes R. Kelly was “railroaded” in his racketeering and sex trafficking case. On Monday, Kelly’s trial came to a close, with the singer being found guilty on all nine counts. Kelly “was screwed” and “wasn’t going to catch a break” at any point during the month-long trial, according to Cosby, who was recently released from prison on a technicality in June. “The odds were stacked against Robert,” Wyatt explained. “His constitutional rights were blatantly violated. I’m not aware of any other country where a documentary can result in criminal charges being brought against someone. “No one fought hard for him,” the spokesman continued, adding that the “Bump N’ Grind” singer’s lawyers failed to “humanize” him properly in their case. “He also lacked the resources and means; he should have sought assistance from the court.” Wyatt continued, “He would have gotten better representation.” “This is the same guy who wrote ‘I Believe I Can Fly’ when there were rumors about young girls. Every wedding and every church plays this song. He was collaborating on a song with Lady Gaga! Kelly faces a maximum sentence of ten years in prison if convicted of the charges. His sentencing date has been set for May 4. According to CNN, US Attorney Jacquelyn Kasulis said, “Today’s guilty verdict forever brands R. Kelly as a predator, who used his fame and fortune to prey on the young, the vulnerable, and the voiceless for his own sexual gratification.” “A predator who used his inner circle to ensnare underage girls and young men and women for decades in a sordid web of sex abuse, exploitation, and humiliation,” she continued. Gloria Allred, who represented three of the six victims who testified against Kelly in the trial, also had something to say about the charges. “First, he exploited his celebrity to recruit vulnerable underage girls in order to sexually abuse them. “These were not May-October relationships, as his defense attorney wanted the jury to believe — these were crimes against children and some adults,” Allred said.

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