TikTok Trend: Drinking Pineapple Juice Before Wisdom Teeth Surgery

Usually when people on the internet are consuming large amounts of pineapple juice, it’s because they’re trying to improve the flavor of their semen and/or vaginal fluids. The pineapple juice chugging trend is once again sweeping the internet, but this time the TikTokers swilling the super sweet fruit juice aren’t preparing for oral sex, but rather wisdom teeth surgery.

The latest TikTok health hack has people drinking pineapple juice before having their wisdom teeth extracted in an attempt to reduce the swelling that leaves most of us looking like chipmunks with bloody gauze coming out of our mouths post-surgery. Unlike many typically dubious TikTok “health” trends, this one might actually have some merit (and is also probably a better use of pineapple juice than the semen-flavoring attempts for which it’s best known, as there’s little evidence to suggest pineapple juice alone actually has any significant impact on the flavor of your spunk).

Pineapples, and thus pineapple juice, contain an enzyme called bromelain, which boasts natural anti-inflammatory effects. These anti-inflammatory properties could help reduce the swelling and pain typically associated with wisdom teeth extraction, Texas-based oral surgeon Dr. William Graves told Insider, though he also reminded any potential pineapple juice chuggers that some degree of swelling and discomfort is normal after undergoing any invasive procedure.

According to the TikTokers trying out the trend, the pineapple juice hack seems to work. Videos show users chugging giant two-liter bottles of pineapple juice the night before their wisdom teeth surgery, then showing off their post-surgical results. Most post-extraction updates seem to show pretty successful results, with little to no visible swelling the next day or even just hours after surgery.

However, as anyone who has ever consumed large amounts of pineapple or pineapple juice — for whatever reason, not judging — knows, the super-sweet, highly acidic fruit can have adverse effects on your oral and digestive health, particularly when consumed in high quantities. While the bromelain in pineapple may help reduce inflammation, it can also lead to discomfort and burning in your mouth, while the acid and sugar may upset your stomach.

So if you still have wisdom teeth to be extracted and want to try giving the pineapple juice hack a whirl, go for it. But if you’d rather not risk the acid burns, heavy sugar consumption and possible indigestion, might I suggest treating your post-surgery pain and inflammation the old fashioned way: drugs.

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